Moving on over

I've combined my blogs, just look at the last post, over at Alchemy of Clay. Trying to have a life outside blogland. Not sure it's going to work....

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Basilica of St. Lawrence, Asheville, NC

Sepia Saturday, HERE, shows a dome from the Library of Congress.  (If you chose to add your own blog post, just go to the bottom of the Sepia Saturday page, where various names are listed, and you can click on each of them to see other blogs about mainly this theme, and add your own, easy peasy)



Nice.


Here's our local dome.  It and the entire building is made entirely of bricks and mortar...a freestanding elliptical dome with a span of 58 feet by 82 feet.  Rafael Gustavino, the architect, worked on the Biltmore house as well, here in Asheville.

Wikipedia says this about the dome of the Basilica of St. Lawrence -
The basilica was designed and built in 1905 by Spanish architect Rafael Guastavino along with his fellow architect R. S. Smith and the surrounding Catholic community of Asheville, North Carolina. The Basilica is on the National Register of Historic Places and was elevated in status to a Minor Basilica in 1993 by Pope John Paul II. The basilica is the only basilica in Western North Carolina. The basilica's dome has a span of 58 by 82 feet (18 by 25 m) and is reputed to be the largest freestanding elliptical dome in North America
A publication by the Basilica gives more information HERE.

All photos are from Wikimedia commons.


Tours are available, and I have already enjoyed one.  Photos are allowed while walking through the building also.

20 comments:

  1. Thank you foer telling me about the Basilica of St. Lawrence, as it was new to me. .

    ReplyDelete
  2. My husband was baptized and confirmed there and our daughter was baptized there. I'm sure you know that Guastavino's family estate is right there in Black Mountain. It's on a list of nearby places we need to visit.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Lovely post. This was new to me as well.

    ReplyDelete
  4. The dome, seen from inside, is breathtaking!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it's one of those things that a camera lens can't quite convey the enormity of it's span when viewed over your head. Must be about time that I went to look at it again. (Not being Catholic, I don't see it regularly like some of my friends do.)

      Delete
  5. Whew! That's a lot of brick. Being from earthquake-prone California, I'd be a little nervous sitting under that dome were it built here. But perhaps the geodesic design - even using brick - makes it strong than one might suppose? It is beautiful, however, and very impressive.

    ReplyDelete
  6. The brickwork in the dome makes it look almost like basketweave. Great photo, thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Although all domes have some different characteristics, almost all are similarly attractive and inspiring.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Western North Carolina seems so laid back and quiet, so reading that it has an actual basilica, minor or otherwise, is a real surprise to me. It's beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I am sure I remember the basilica from a visit to Asheville. I seem to remember chimes. I did not visit inside, what a shame.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I just love the fact that you have a ‘local dome’ - lucky you. And a Spanish architect too; I’m off to the mainland (Spain of course) next month so hope to see more of this sort of thing.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Wow! You are so lucky to have that. I would just love to go there. It looks fabulous.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Beautiful! I'll have to put it on our travel list.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Magnificent building - does it bring a lot of tourists?

    ReplyDelete
  14. A lovely example of a beautiful dome, as so often found in churches.

    ReplyDelete
  15. That is so beautiful. A dome of bricks, I've never seen one.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I walked past it twice today. It is a very impressive building and the craftsmanship put into the dome is the result of Italian artisans who immigrated here to help construct the Biltmore estate. But it's most important contribution to Asheville traditions is the hourly chime from the bells (actually electronic now) I think my dog even knows what time it is by hearing the bells from the basilica.

    ReplyDelete
  17. It's nice to know a fellow blogger is also a neighbor. We shall have to meet for coffee someday, yes?

    ReplyDelete
  18. Simply loved this, would love to visit it sometimes.

    ReplyDelete
  19. That is a lovely ceiling. Would make a nice patter for a rug.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for your comments. They will be posted as soon as they are moderated by the blog author.