Moving on over

I've combined my blogs, just look at the last post, over at Alchemy of Clay. Trying to have a life outside blogland. Not sure it's going to work....

Friday, June 13, 2014

Wild Flowers part 2

Wild Marshmallow

An herbal remedy, or edible root source.
Found growing in abundance in moist and wet places all over the world, marshmallow is a perennial aromatic herb that is sometimes found to grow up to four feet in height. While the herb can be found growing in plenty in the wild, it is also cultivated commercially for medicinal use. The root of the plant is white in color and tastes sweet similar to the parsnip (a long tapering cream-colored root cooked and consumed as a vegetable). However, unlike the parsnip, marshmallow roots contain plenty of mucilage (a gummy substance secreted by some plants containing protein and carbohydrates). The plant has numerous branchless stems that are wooly or covered with long, soft, white hairs. The marshmallow stems bear serrate (edged with indentations or with projections that resemble the teeth of a saw) and pubescent (covered with down or fine hair) leaves. The flowers of the herb are approximately two inches in width and they may be found in white, light red or royal purple colors.
Ointment or cream prepared with marshmallow leaves and elder flowers is an excellent remedy to cure facial aching, skin rashes or eruptions, leg ulcers and repulsive-looking wounds more rapidly. To prepare the useful ointment, first gently mash about one gallon of fresh marshmallow leaves and mature flowers each. Next, spread out the mashed leaves and flowers uniformly in a big roast pan and add approximately two-and one-fourth cups of liquefied lard and one-and-a-half pounds of beeswax. Blend and beat the ingredients systematically with a wooden serving spoon, cover the pan and allow the ingredients to simmer or boil on an oven in 150° F. Continue simmering the ingredients until the herbs are reasonably crunchy and crush when touched. Then drain out the liquid mixture using a wire net strainer and keep on stirring the liquid with a wooden ladle till it is completely cold. Once the mixture has cooled, you may add half a cup of glycerin or 2/3 cup of pulverized slippery elm to preserve the ointment. Next, pour the ointment in clean jars or containers while it is still fairly warm and let it become firm to some extent. Seal the jars with air-tight lids and store the ointment in a cool and dry place till it is required for use.  (Source:Herbs)
This may be the first time I've found it in the wild.  I recognized it because I drew a copy of a line drawing about 40 years ago for a greeting card, in pen and ink.  I guess I liked the idea that something this pretty would be the source of the name for a confection.


Thought for the day:


Live in the present. Do the things that need to be done. Do all the good you can each day. The future will unfold.
Peace Pilgrim

2 comments:

  1. I had never even heard of a Marshmallow plant!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have seen it while visiting Minnesota but never really knew its real name.

    ReplyDelete

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